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Honolulu to Prince William Sound to SitkaJune 27, 2018We left Honolulu on Starr heading for Dutch Harbor on May 28. I didn’t know it at the time, but there was a ghost on our ship. As we departed Honolulu, there were five of us on board: Don and I, and our guests/crew, Bill Leary (Noodle) and Clay Huchinson (both from Kaneohe), and Kyle Kim (from Honolulu). The “Ghost” was just a dim shadow at departure,...

Lituya Bay is a six mile long by mile and a half wide body of water that runs between the steep glacier covered mountains on the northeastern end of the bay and the ocean to the southwest. The entrance to the bay is a narrow channel only thirty five feet deep in the middle that quickly shoals on either side. With a twelve foot tidal swing, there is a lot of water that moves into...

Lady Luck has decided to stay aboard Starr as a member of the crew so far on this passage across the Gulf of Alaska. She has given us more than a day of glassy ocean out here as we head for Lituya Bay. Lori Lloyd, who is quite susceptible to sea sickness, is our canary in the coal mine and so far she is having a great time.Good luck is important out here. I got...

A Whale of a Tail/Tale!Hey Kat!This story is for you!Yesterday we were ready to leave Northern Alaska to head across the Gulf of Alaska to Sitka. Sharry had just mentioned that we hadn’t seen very many whales over the past couple of weeks and just then I heard a scratching sound against the side of Starr’s hull. It sounded like rough sandpaper rubbing and the boat moved slightly to the port as though it was...

June 26, 201859 41N, 144 32W;2300ZWe are making the 350nm crossing of the Gulf of Alaska heading to Sitka and just passed Cape St Elias on our port side, 75nm East of Prince William Sound.As I filled in the Ship’s Log I noted that we had covered 3165nm since leaving Honolulu with only 225nm of open water left to get to Lituya Bay Just North of Cape Spencer. The rest of the run to Seattle...

After some terrific glacier viewing we picked our way back out through the ice cubes to clear water. The spot where the ice ended was right over a submerged moraine, the ancient limit of glacial ice where rubble carried by the ice was deposited creating a shallow area. The moraine was very popular with the Otter. There were multiple rafts of as many as thirty of them floating around. It looked like some kind of...

Starr’s course wavered as she headed north, but we finally decided on Disk Island off of the mainland. On the way there we set our shrimp pots in 350 feet of water hoping for better luck than our first drop. We saw a small boat sitting stationary nearby and headed over to speak with them. They had just landed a thirty five pound halibut and gave us some tips on where to find more. We...

Yesterday we explored some awesome hidey holes here in the sound. Our guide book said that a couple of the coves in Jackpot Bay are cruiser favorites, and we had to check them out.We also decided it was time to do some shrimping and fussed around for an hour setting our two pots in 300 feet of water outside the bay. The pots, line, clips, and buoys were all new equipment Don bought in Dutch...

One of our consultants told us about the great glacier viewing in Icy Bay, so we headed in that direction after a pleasant morning in Otter Cove. It was like entering a different world as Starr approached the entrance to the bay. All of a sudden the water was full of small ice bergs, which we hadn’t seen before. We were trying to get close to Chegena Glacier, but the bergy bits got so dense...

It was late in the morning by the time we finished socializing with the couple off of the Nordhaven, so we skipped the hiking in Fox Farm and headed off toward our next anchorage. Some of our local knowledge experts had raved about the beauty of Bainbridge Passage, a six mile long channel into Prince William Sound between the continent and Bainbridge Island. This narrow cut is only a quarter mile wide in places and...